How to Navigate Denver’s Commercial Real Estate Market

There may come a time when your small business has outgrown its retail or home office space. This is great news as it means you are ready to expand. It also means you are about to jump into the competitive pool of Denver’s rapidly changing commercial real estate market. With developers scrambling to keep up with demand, every size and type of real estate – from historic manors and Beaux-Arts buildings to factories and warehouses – is being repurposed for trendy niche retailers and giant corporations alike. The average asking lease price for warehouse space in some neighborhoods jumped by more than 50 percent from 2010 to 2015. By the end of 2016, retail development hit its highest levels since 2010 with nearly 1 million square feet under construction according to the CBRE. Without a team of professionals on hand, like larger organizations have, a small business attorney can help you make decisions about location, leasing or buying, tax deductions and compliance, and protecting your assets. Whatever type of retail space, office, or other commercial property you may need for your flourishing business, consider these five helpful tips before you commit to a contract.

  1. Make a New Plan
  2. Choose the Right Location
  3. Decide Whether to Lease or Buy
  4. Have Exit and Dispute Strategies
  5. Know What You are Signing

1. Make a New Plan

Even if you have been in business for years, you need a revised plan for your expansion. Consider your needs versus your budget. Do you have the resources to close on a property or repay a loan? A solid business plan is an important factor for lenders who are considering your loan application. Within your business plan, lenders are looking to see whether you have a marketing strategy – have you considered your competitors? The habits of your targeted customers and neighborhood? A back-up plan to deal with the pitfalls? A small business attorney will help ensure your plans and real estate choices are realistic and the best for your business.

2. Choose the Right Location

When selecting the area or neighborhood for your business, there are many factors to consider. Demographics, surroundings, centrality, visibility, and compatibility with your desired image are a few of the areas you should research before choosing your location. You would also benefit by researching forecasts and trends for the district (e.g. new projects, funding, crime rates, and other public records that may affect your business). It is essential to be aware of the current and potential value of the properties you look at, especially if you are going to buy rather than lease.

3. Decide Whether to Lease or Buy

A storefront or office space can boost your business’s image. Commercial real estate not only provides a dedicated space outside of your home, but it can help with marketing. As with most real estate, buying commercial real estate is more expensive in the short term than leasing, but less expensive over the long term if you intend to stay in the location. While buying gives you more flexibility and an asset to use when financing other parts of your business, it also means you are responsible for all aspects of your property, including maintenance and additional liability. An attorney will help you decide whether leasing or buying is right for your business.

4. Have Exit and Dispute Strategies

It is important to have an exit strategy if your business does not perform as well as anticipated or your plans have simply changed. What if you can no longer afford the property? What if unexpected factors in the area are negatively impacting your business? What if you decide to sell the business? You should be prepared for these types of scenarios as well as any arising disputes. Tenants of commercial property have fewer consumer protections, and leases are binding contracts. To avoid conflict or severe penalties, be sure to have your small business attorney review any lease or purchase contracts before you sign.

5. Know What You are Signing

By this point in the process, you may be fairly familiar with the world of commercial real estate and its accompanying laws: landlord/tenant laws, disclosure laws, zoning laws, contract laws, insurance laws, etc. Leasing or purchasing agreements fall under contract law and can be very confusing. Your attorney will go over these contracts with you line by line until you fully understand what you are signing in order to prevent any surprises or compliance issues in the future.

If you need help with leasing or buying commercial real estate, contact me, Elizabeth Lewis, at the Law Office of E.C. Lewis, P.C., home of your Denver Small Business Lawyer. Phone: 720-258-6647. Email: elizabeth.lewis@eclewis.com

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Contact Us Today

Law Office of E.C. Lewis, P.C.
Your Denver Business Attorney
501 S. Cherry St., Suite 1100
Denver, CO 80264
720-258-6647
Elizabeth.Lewis@eclewis.com

Sign Up For Our Email Newsletter

Privacy by SafeSubscribeSM